WARMER WEATHER BRINGS MORE COMPETITION

Nepalese Student Association soccer teamJenna Crowe

Staff Writer

All ISU soccer enthusiasts are invited to attend a soccer tournament hosted by the Nepalese Student Association, NSA, on Cadet Field April 1 and 2 for a chance to win bragging rights, prize money and a medal.

While more than 95 percent of participants every year are members of the NSA, there are always a few competitors that aren’t members, but are always welcome.

“[Non-members] are mostly soccer enthusiasts who have played scrimmage with some of us,” said Bibek Karki,  NSA member since 2011. “Nonetheless, we welcome all the soccer enthusiasts who want to learn about our culture and traditions.”

Snacks are offered to all participants and the first few guests. Both the winning and runner-up teams will receive medals and prize money.

The first soccer tournament was held in Oct. 2014, when last year’s vice president Mohan Madai came to ISU. Since then, Karki and Madai have taken central roles in organizing the soccer tournament every semester.

“We do it so the Nepalese community can come together and enjoy the sport that is extremely famous in our country,” Karki said.

The tournament has always been an opportunity for community exposure, according to Karki, because members want the public to know about the Nepalese culture, traditions and interests.

NSA events, including the soccer tournament, have been funded by the association and its members. Related events include the annual NSA KHASI CUP and semi-annual NSA FIFA Tournament, both of which are funded by participants themselves.

A new soccer-themed event, Inter-Fan Club Futsal Tournament, will be planned annually and added to the NSA events calendar.

The first Inter-Fan Club Futsal Tournament will be held on March 12 on the main court of Reed Gym.

People are encouraged to attend to find out more about what the NSA has to offer.

“You feel secure when you find such a good community with beautiful souls around you, when you are thousand miles away from your country and family,” Madai said. “Also, you feel special when the community appreciates your presence and wishes for your success.”

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